Full Interview with Giles Fraser

Politics at the Cross+Roads
Politics at the Cross+Roads
Full Interview with Giles Fraser
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Giles covered a lot of ground in our conversation. For those wanting to listen, here is the full and unedited version of our conversation. You can find a shorter version of our discussion on the iTunes page. Enjoy!

Giles Fraser

Politics at the Cross+Roads
Politics at the Cross+Roads
Giles Fraser
/

Today I had the great pleasure of welcoming our first guest to Politics at the Cross+Roads, Rev Canon Dr Giles Fraser. Giles will be well known to many listeners as a journalist with Unherd (and previously with the Guardian). Giles is a priest and canon in the Church of England and he regularly contributes to Radio 4’s Thought for the Day and the Moral Maze. We had an absolutely fascinating discussion about how he sees the relationship between socialism and conservatism, about whether the pandemic is a post liberal moment and how the Church roots us in community, warts and all. 

  • For Giles’ new book, Chosen: Lost and Found Between Christianity and Judaism (Penguin, 2021), see https://www.penguin.co.uk/books/213/213476/chosen/9780241003268.html
  • For Giles’ post liberal reading list, see https://unherd.com/2019/11/a-post-liberal-reading-list/
  • On churches and the pandemic, see Giles’ thoughts here https://twitter.com/giles_fraser/status/1354091428092268545, https://unherd.com/2020/12/why-i-wont-be-closing-my-church-this-christmas/ and https://unherd.com/2020/11/boris-johnson-doesnt-get-god/
  • For Giles’ discussion of Jesus as a somewhere and Paul as an anywhere, see https://unherd.com/2018/08/jesus-somewhere-paul-anywhere/
  • On postliberalism and the Magnificent Seven, see https://unherd.com/2020/04/the-magnificent-seven-is-a-post-liberal-idyll/

Giles Fraser (Politics at the Cross+Roads, Episode 1)

In this first video in the Politics at the Cross+Roads series, Giles Fraser talks about how he sees the relationship between socialism and conservatism, about whether the pandemic is a post liberal moment and how the local church roots us in a place and in community.

You can also listen to this episode in shorter form here or in its entirety over on iTunes here.

In Praise of Unherd’s Coverage of Lockdown

According to a recent Sky/YouGov poll, trust in journalists is at an all time low. In the results of the poll, which surveyed 1652 British adults, journalists fared the worst in terms of public faith, with TV journalists receiving a net score of minus 40 and newspaper journalists, minus 55.

The issue of public trust in journalism is certainly complex. There’s clearly a massive debate to be had about the limits of this data (extent), where the data is and isn’t pointing in this direction (demographics), why people are thinking this way (cause) and why all of this matters (significance).

But in the face of this story, I want to focus on an example of journalism that I have greatly appreciated. In all of this, I have been most impressed by the coverage of the lockdown offered by the team at Unherd.

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Location, Location: Does It Matter Where Church Services Happen During the Coronavirus?

The Problem

On 24th March, the Archbishops of Canterbury and York penned a joint letter in which they advised clergy not to enter churches to conduct services.

For some, this decision has spelled not only a missed opportunity but a dereliction of duty. Giles Fraser has complained that in abandoning its church buildings, the Church of England has retreated from public life. Fraser echoes Bishop Selby who has similarly registered his despondency over the church hierarchy’s decision to go beyond government advice. In doing so, Selby writes, those in positions of leadership

…seem to have accepted the idea that Christianity is a matter for the domestic realm, that our cathedrals and parish churches are just optional when useful and available, no longer the eloquent signs of the consecration of our public life and public spaces. The conviction that the ministry of Word and Sacrament in the places of beauty set apart is an “essential work” undertaken by “key workers” will have become a wistful “BC” [Before Coronovirus] memory. 

I take a very different view.

Continue reading “Location, Location: Does It Matter Where Church Services Happen During the Coronavirus?”

Three Podcasts to Listen to in 2020

My previous job involved a long commute. I didn’t always have the energy to read books or the newspaper. Inevitably, podcasts became a way to explore fresh ideas. Here are 3 of my favourite podcasts from 2019. Consider it a list of recommended sources for all things Christianity and/or politics in the year ahead. (You can read my list of the ten best podcast episodes of 2019 here).

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The Ten Best Podcast Episodes of 2019

Here is my list of the ten best podcast episodes from 2019. You can also read my list of the three podcasts you should listen to in 2020 here.

Continue reading “The Ten Best Podcast Episodes of 2019”

Book Review—Graham Tomlin, Looking Beyond Brexit: Bringing The Country Back Together (SPCK, 2019)

To move forward with Brexit as a nation, we need to recognise that both sides of the debate are right in what they affirm, Graham Tomlin suggests.

Graham Tomlin, Looking Beyond Brexit: Bringing The Country Back Together (SPCK, 2019).

In this 30 page treatise, Graham Tomlin (Bishop of Kensington) somehow manages to breathe fresh life into how I think about Brexit. He does so not by focussing on the Brexit debate itself as a set of complex political or economic issues. Rather, he looks at how we might begin to heal and move forward as a nation post-Brexit. For my money, three things make his short book worth reading.

Continue reading “Book Review—Graham Tomlin, Looking Beyond Brexit: Bringing The Country Back Together (SPCK, 2019)”