Bible Reading Week 6 (Feb 6th – 13th 2022)

 

Week 1Week 2Week 3; Week 4; Week 5

As the Jacob narrative comes close to its end, our readings in Genesis take us part way through the Joseph story. One of the most gripping novellas in all of the Hebrew Bible, it is filled with pathos, jealousy, brotherly rivalry, murderous plots, intrigue, political power and unlikely twists. The favouritism of Isaac towards Esau, of Rebekah towards Jacob, and of Jacob towards Rachel now bears fruit in the mutual hatred between Rachel’s son Joseph, Jacob’s favourite, and Joseph’s brothers.

In the New Testament readings, John’s Gospel reaches its climax in the resurrection and Jesus’s appearance to the disciples, including his moving encounter with Mary Magdalene and Thomas. In a single chapter, Jesus is acclaimed as “rabboni” (my teacher) by Mary, “my Lord and my God” by Thomas, and as “messiah and Son of God” by the narrator who finally gives away his purpose in writing his gospel (20:31, see below Q2). We also begin Matthew’s gospel, where Jesus is declared as Messiah three times in three verses (1:16-18) and as the one who will save his people from their sins. There is a greater darkness to Matthew’s infancy narrative than Luke’s, I think, where the only shadow comes in the form of Simeon’s words to Mary: “a sword will pierce your own side too”. In Matthew’s account, we have a blink-and-you’d-miss-it reference to the grim and gory tale of Bathsheba and Uriah, Tamar’s crafty impregnation by her father in law (see Genesis 38), another potential scandal with Joseph’s betrothed Mary found to be pregnant, the massacre of the innocents and Herod searching desperately for Joseph and his family to murder their young child.

There are all sorts of fascinating connections between the readings from Matthew and those from Genesis in recent weeks: Jacobs beget Josephs; dreaming Josephs dwell in Egypt; the Tamar of Genesis 38 makes a seemingly unlikely appearance in the genealogy of Messiah; Jesus’s birth takes place in Bethlehem, the least of the town of the tribe of Judah. At Jesus’s baptism, God names him his beloved Son (ἀγαπητός), in an echo of Genesis 22. In a way that the ram Abraham sacrificed in Isaac’s place points to, this beloved Son will save his people from their sins by dying in their place (Mt 20:28). And, perhaps most poignantly of all, just as we are told constantly that “God was with Joseph”, now we learn that this same God has mysteriously entered human history and become Immanuel, “God with us” in Jesus (1:23; cf. Mt 28:20).

Our questions this week concern how we should read Genesis 38-39 (the stories of Tamar and Judah, and Potiphar’s wife and Joseph) and the purpose of John’s gospel, as stated in chapter 20 verse 31.

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Bible Reading Week 5 (Jan 31 – Feb 6, 2022)

 Week 1Week 2Week 3; Week 4

There is a strong note of family relations running through this week’s readings. We read of brotherly reconciliation (Gen 33), family tragedy (the death of Rachel, Gen 35:19) and the rise of Israel/Jacob and his descendants (36:6-8) as well as hints of family division which will carry into the Joseph story (34:30-31; 35:22 where Reuben sleeps with Jacob’s concubine, and a note of literary suspense when we read …”and Jacob heard of it”).

The family theme continues in the New Testament readings, as Simeon announces to Mary, the mother of Jesus, that a “sword will pierce your own side too” as she and Joseph fulfil the requirements of the Law (that family tension will continue when the teenage Jesus leaves his family for the Temple). And in John 17, Jesus addresses his Father and ours, in the High Priestly Prayer. As a new father, I was struck by Jesus’s use of the experience of childbirth as an analogy for the disciples’ initial grief at Jesus’ near-departure which will be eclipsed by the joy of their eventual reunion: “When a woman is giving birth, she has sorrow because her hour has come, but when she has delivered the baby, she no longer remembers the anguish, for joy that a human being has been born into the world” (John 16:21).

The two questions below deal with the promise made to Jacob and how these compares with those made to Abraham and Isaac, and a question about the divine name in John 17.

Continue reading “Bible Reading Week 5 (Jan 31 – Feb 6, 2022)”