Legality and Morality in the Partygate and Djokovic Affairs (Final Covid Diary?)

With a promised end to restrictions in the UK at the end of the month, I’m hoping that this post will serve as my final Covid diary. Indeed, it now seems time to call time on almost two years of life-altering, state-mandated restraints. For all its raging transmissibility, the Omicron has thankfully resulted in very low numbers of hospitalisations and deaths. 

What continues to rage, however, are the fiery cultural divisions in society. There seems to be a perverse, inverse relationship between the level of threat of the virus and how mad and maddening we behave towards it and one another. Why is this? In large this is because the pandemic has been a moral crisis as well as a public health one. To be sure, we are fooling ourselves if we think that the last two years has simply been about health. At root, the last two years have laid bare deep and troubling metaphysical assumptions about risk,puritydeath

We’ve seen these cultural and moral assumptions play out in two recent events: first, the revelations of PM Boris Johnson’s attendance at mass party events in May 2020 and second, the deportation of tennis star Novak Djokovic from Australia. Both events raise two distinct questions which I will explore in what follows: 

First, the question of legality and fairness: were the rules created applied consistently and fairly (including, in the case of the first event, by those who created them!)? 

And second, and more deeply, the question of morality and reasonableness: are the rules themselves worth following? 

Continue reading “Legality and Morality in the Partygate and Djokovic Affairs (Final Covid Diary?)”

Nigel Biggar (Politics at the Cross+Roads, Episode 3)

In the third episode of Politics at Cross+Roads, I had the pleasure of speaking with Christian ethicist, Nigel Biggar. Nigel is Regius Professor of Moral and Pastoral Theology at Christchurch College, University of Oxford. Before that, he taught theology and ethics Leeds and Trinity College, Dublin. Nigel has written on pretty much all the big topics in ethics and public life—war and peace, medical ethics and euthanasia, the nation, empire and much more. He also has a new book out on rights with Oxford University Press.

In the course of the episode, we discussed rights and duties in the context of the pandemic, thinking Christianly about the nation and the importance of realism. I hope you enjoy the conversation as much as I did. 

You can listen to the shorter podcast episode here on iTunes.